Tag Archives: Pokemon Go; negligence law

Pokemon Go: a change of landscape for insurers and gamers alike

As a concerned parent, I have recently had cause to discuss with few fellow mums and dads the whys and wherefores of the Pokemon Go ‘phenomenon’; which, like the word ‘crisis’, has become one of those hyperbolic usages that characterises this age of sensationalism we are living in.

In line with accepted best practice parenting, one particular couple said they took the immersive approach, having decided to spend last Saturday afternoon playing it with their 12-year-old son.

Their rather tame introduction took them as far as the local shops in search of the nearest Pokemon to capture, which for the uninitiated, is the principal aim of the game. And sure enough, right there, smack bang in the middle of the road (in reality, well sort of) was the coveted creature.

It was at this point in telling the story that the boy’s father made the observation that the Google Map data used to determine the player’s location and distribute the various Pokemon is not vetted. Therefore players could well be led onto a busy road in search of glory; or off a cliff perhaps. Yikes!!

However, could or should it be? The conventional wisdom among gamers is that Pokemon are distributed by operation of an algorithm (a bit like the mysterious way Google sees some people’s websites arrive higher up the list of search responses than others). Therefore, it seems to be somewhat random.

The game’s terms and conditions say players should “be aware of [their] surroundings and play safely. …[and take] responsibility to maintain such health, liability, hazard, personal injury, medical, life, and other insurance policies … reasonably necessary for any injuries.”

But what about the 5 year-old child who all alone embarks on the same trip to the shops on a Pokemon Go quest and is busy standing in the middle of the road trying to make a catch when a car screams around the corner…

Even if such a disclaimer would have any force at law, surely it couldn’t be used to protect against this kind of claim.

Subject to a contributory negligence reduction (which would be little or none for a child of this age), this situation would be the responsibility of the CTP insurer. However, if I were the CTP insurer, I’d be ready for battle with a cross claim for contribution from the game provider. Surely such a tragic result is foreseeable enough to give rise to a duty of care on its part. The misplaced Pokemon could perhaps be likened to the ‘snail in the bottle’ a la Donoghue v Stevenson.

Then the question arises as to how reasonable it is to expect the system to be sufficiently controlled by the provider so as not to put its users in such obvious peril. That would make for a fascinating debate, though it may never reach a courtroom given it would likely result in the scrutiny of the top secret Pokemon distribution algorithm itself.

Airbnb now offers complimentary landlord style insurance to its subscribers whose use of the property as a short term rental might see them excluded by a conventional policy. So I’m sure there is an insurer brave enough to take on this new risk at the right premium, something I’d be strongly recommending if it hasn’t been done already.

Apparently, there’s already a Russian bank already offering to insure users themselves (https://www.rt.com/business/351813-pokemon-go-sberbank-insurance).

Watch this space (no pun intended).

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Filed under Civil, contributory negligence, Insurance, Negligence